UK government tells private schools to let local primaries use their swimming facilities

UK government tells private schools to let local primaries use their swimming facilities

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Obesity in children has tripled in many states over the last 40 years. The epidemic is identified by the way in which most communities do not have well-built structures that support healthy physical activity. With the government-mandated school care programs, schools are beginning to develop strategies to help fight this epidemic, but many schools have reduced their training hours and many schools have no access to outdoor sports grounds. free, Therefore, many schools, children are still not interested in physical activity during school hours.  In addition, many children and their families do not have enough recreational facilities to train and play during school hours. In the past, schools have many recreational facilities, such as a covered gymnasium, playgrounds, field courses and cable cars. In any case, many of these schools close their post-school structures due to concerns about cost, vandalism, safety, maintenance, and liability in the event of injury. However, during this period of financial constraints, it is difficult to make better use of time and resources to ask swimming pool installers to build duplicate facilities that are now accessible in community schools. Fortunately, a new and promising tool has been developed, known as the Collocation Agreement, which solves a considerable number of these problems. A Joint Use Agreement (SUA) is a formal agreement between two different government entities, regularly a school district and a city or area that creates the conditions for the sharing of public property. In general, any party that falls under a sharing agreement will be responsible for funding the progress, activities and maintenance of the joint facilities.                                         

No party assumes responsibility for the expenses and obligations of the recreational facilities. In addition, after the usual school hours, schools can continue to provide their students and the nearby community with the necessary facilities needed for a healthy and functional lifestyle at no additional cost. As a result, laws have been passed in many states encouraging or even encouraging schools to open their facilities to the community. The National Network for Analysis and Policy on the Prevention of Childhood Obesity (NPLAN) has developed a 50-state law that addresses the use of schools by the community or, in other words, recognizes school strategies.  State that determines the use of school property by individuals in the community for non-school purposes. Although some schools are reluctant to continue with numerous schools and networks, they are pleased with the results of the JUA, the increase in school district funds, the rejuvenation of the neighbourhood, and greater physical and social activity. As childhood obesity increases, interest in more recreational facilities in the community will also increase. In a first step, tutors and community members can apply for access to these public facilities by asking their schools and neighbouring government agencies to sign a joint site agreement.  At the time when community facilities or school premises are made accessible to the community, the fictitious state of the community and public health is likely to improve. The use of school facilities, which are not used in any form after school hours, allows for the more effective use of public and effective spaces and a relatively simple system against child obesity.

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